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Review of cost-effectiveness

Researchers from Duke University and Duke NUS Medical School compared clinically proven, nonsurgical weight-loss treatments for people who are overweight and obese, including meal replacement programs (Jenny Craig), lifestyle programs (WW), medications (Qsymia, Alli, Xenical, Belviq , Contrave, Saxenda), and intragastric balloon (Orbera). Their 2019 meta-analysis, published in Clinical Obesity, reported the finding that WW Workshops are the only cost-effective, commercially available, evidence-based option.
 

  Cost ($) Mean
(95% CI)
Effectiveness
Mean
(95% CI)
ACER ($) Mean
(95% CI)
WW Workshops 424 (321-533) 3.2 (2.2 - 4.05) 134 (92-204)
Qsymia 7.5/46 2194 (1627-2743) 6.7 (6.1-7.3) 327 (245-422)
Alli 60 mg x 3 daily 615 (470-764) 2.5 (1.5-3.4) 251 (157-429)
Xenical 120 mg x 3 daily 6164 (4538-7601) 3.0 (2.4-3.6) 2028 (1472-2809)
Contrave 8mg/90mg x 4 daily  2498 (1921-3140) 4.6 (4.2-5.0) 541 (389-689)
Saxenda 3mg 11644 (8820-14322) 5.5 (5.2-5.9) 2102 (1548-2648)
Belviq 10 mg x 2 daily 2658 (2054-3295) 3.2 (2.6 - 3.8) 823 (588-1112)
Jenny Craig 3301 (2499-4101) 7.4 (5.8 - 9.0) 444 (318-633)
Obera 6500 (4867-8081) 4.4 (3.0-5.8) 1467 (978-2266)


​Source: Finkelstein E. A. & Verghese, N.R. (2019) Kruger E. Incremental cost‐effectiveness of evidence‐based non‐surgical weight loss strategies. Clinical Obesity. 9(2), e12294.

 

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